Gemma Ahaibwe

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Financing Indoor Residual Spraying for Malaria Prevention in Uganda: Options for Cost Minimization
This report's findings indicate that 235 billion shillings (approximately 63.5 million US$) is required to finance country-wide implementation of Indoor Residual Spaying (IRS) using an Integrated District-Led (IDL) approach.
Education, Marriage, Fertility and Labour Market Experiences of Young Women in Uganda: Evidence From a Qualitative Assessment

Using qualitative methodologies, this paper explores the inter linkages between the transitions from school to work or motherhood and/or marriage and the ensuing effects on future labour market outcomes and choices.

Drivers for Early Labour Market Transitions of Young Women in Uganda: Evidence from the 2015 School to Work Transition Survey

This paper jointly estimates the drivers of key life cycle decisions of educational attainment, marriage age, age of first birth and age at first entry into the labour market for young women in Uganda aged 15-24 years.

Early Labour Market Transitions of Young Women in Uganda

Using the School to Work Transition Surveys (SWTS 2013 and 2015) and the Demographic and Health Surveys (2006 and 2011) for Uganda, this paper descriptively explores links between educational attainment, age of marriage and child-birth and labour market outcomes for young people (15-24 years of age).

Overcoming the reproductive health challenges to young women’s employment prospects in Uganda

This brief identifies possible ways in which to enhance the employment prospects of young people in Uganda. It is based on a qualitative survey conducted in four districts of Uganda—Masaka, Namayingo, Yumbe and Kampala.

Education, Marriage, Fertility and Work Choices of Young Women in Uganda

Despite the existence of several policies and laws aimed at empowering women to participate as equal partners in development, a number of challenges remain in Uganda. This policy brief explores links between educational attainment, age of marriage and childbirth, and labour market among young Ugandans (15-24 years of age).

In light of the likely negative impacts of gambling, the industry needs to be strictly controlled, well regulated and effectively policed. Presently, the gambling industry is regulated by the National Lotteries Board (NLB) and is guided by the National Lotteries Act of 1967, the Gaming and Pool Betting (Control and Taxation) Act of 1968, and an addendum of statutory guidelines introduced in 2012/13.

Ensuring healthy lives through access to essential, affordable, quality health care for ‘all’ is the cornerstone of sustainable development and is what proponents of Universal Health Care (UHC) advocate for. Although Uganda has made some progress towards UHC, challenges remain with persistent inequality in access to maternal and child care services.

Socio-Economic Effects of Gambling: Evidence from Kampala City Uganda

The paper explores the socio-economic implications of the gambling industry on welfare and the economy, level of participation and adequacy and effectiveness of the regulatory framework in Kampala City.

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